1. archiemcphee:

    Russian artist Svetlana Petrova has an awesome marmalade cat named Zarathustra whom she photoshops into famous works of art. No matter the renown of the artist or beauty of the subject matter, Zarathustra’s ample tabby frame immediately becomes the hilarious center of attention. He melts alongside Dalí’s clocks, cuddles up to Vermeer’s milkmaid, da Vinci’s Lady with an Ermine and Mona Lisa, and even Whistler’s Mother. We particularly love his use of modesty tail whilst lounging in Edouard Manet’s Olympia and the tip of the tail positioned in place of Adam’s hand in Michelangelo’s The Creation of Adam.

    Petrova is currently exhibiting artwork at The Barn at Stonehill House, in Abingdon, Oxfordshire in a show entitled Russian Extremes – From Icons to I-Cats. The show runs through June 5, 2014.

    Follow the ongoing high art hijinks of Zarathustra at Svetlana Petrova’s website, Fat Cat Art.

    [via RocketNews24]

    (via wilwheaton)

  2. fuckyeahlgbtqartists:

    Meg Allen - Butch

    BUTCH is a documentary portrait project and exploration of the butch aesthetic, identity and presentation of female masculinity as it stands in 2013-14. It is a celebration of those who choose to exist and identify outside of the binary; who still get he’d and she’d differently throughout the day; who get called-out in bathrooms and eyed suspiciously at the airport; who have invented names for themselves as parents because “Mom” nor “Dad” feels quite right; and who will generally expect that stare from the gender police trying to figure out if they are “a boy or a girl”. It is an homage to the bull-daggers and female husbands before me, and to the young studs, gender queers, and bois who continue to bloom into the present. (source)

    (via catiebat)

  3. text
    oupacademic:


You can either go to the church of your choiceOr you can go to Brooklyn State HospitalYou’ll find God in the church of your choiceYou’ll find Woody Guthrie in Brooklyn State Hospital
And though it’s only my opinionI may be right or wrongYou’ll find them bothIn the Grand CanyonAt sundown
—Bob Dylan, “Last thoughts on Woody Guthrie”

Bob Dylan celebrates his 73rd birthday on 24 May. Dylan has been one of the most influential figures in folk music and popular music and culture since the release of his first album in 1962. Read more about the language and influences of the early Bob Dylan.
Image: Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C.; close-up view of vocalist Bob Dylan, August 28, 1963 by Rowland Scherman on assignment from The US Information Agency, 1963. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

    oupacademic:

    You can either go to the church of your choice
    Or you can go to Brooklyn State Hospital
    You’ll find God in the church of your choice
    You’ll find Woody Guthrie in Brooklyn State Hospital

    And though it’s only my opinion
    I may be right or wrong
    You’ll find them both
    In the Grand Canyon
    At sundown

    —Bob Dylan, “Last thoughts on Woody Guthrie”

    Bob Dylan celebrates his 73rd birthday on 24 May. Dylan has been one of the most influential figures in folk music and popular music and culture since the release of his first album in 1962. Read more about the language and influences of the early Bob Dylan.

    Image: Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C.; close-up view of vocalist Bob Dylan, August 28, 1963 by Rowland Scherman on assignment from The US Information Agency, 1963. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

    (via thelifeguardlibrarian)

  4. newyorker:

    The French photographer Antoine Bruy’s fascination with self-sufficient life styles prompted him to travel across a number of European mountain ranges to document people who are trying to gain, in his words, “greater energy, food, economic, or social autonomy.” A look at his photos: http://nyr.kr/1oodSjd

    Top: Vincent, the Pyrenees, France, 2012.
    Bottom: Inside a geodesic dome, Sierra del Hacho, Spain, 2013.
    Photographs by Antoine Bruy.

    (Source: newyorker.com)

  5. text
    secretcinema1:

Nico, Chelsea Girls, 1966
”He saw a candle flickering in another room around a corner and then Nico walked in holding a candelabra. ‘Oh Nico! I’m so sorry!’ he said, suddenly realising Con Edison must have turned off the electricity. ‘I just remembered I forgot to pay the light bill, and here you’ve been in the dark all this time!’ ‘Noooooo, it’s fiiiiine,’ she said, positively beaming with joy. She’d had the happiest time of her whole life, drifting around in the dark for a month.”
- from Popism: The Warhol 60s - Andy Warhol and Pat Hackett

    secretcinema1:

    Nico, Chelsea Girls, 1966

    ”He saw a candle flickering in another room around a corner and then Nico walked in holding a candelabra. ‘Oh Nico! I’m so sorry!’ he said, suddenly realising Con Edison must have turned off the electricity. ‘I just remembered I forgot to pay the light bill, and here you’ve been in the dark all this time!’ ‘Noooooo, it’s fiiiiine,’ she said, positively beaming with joy. She’d had the happiest time of her whole life, drifting around in the dark for a month.”

    - from Popism: The Warhol 60s - Andy Warhol and Pat Hackett

    (via sigh-twombly)

  6. lecinematheque:

    Pumzi - dir. Wanuri Kahiu // Kenya

    In a dystopian future 35 years after an ecological WWIII  has torn the world apart, East African survivors of the devastation remain locked away in contained communities, but a young woman in possession of a germinating seed struggles against the governing council to bring the plant to Earth’s ruined surface.

    (via catiebat)

  7. text

    "

    Roy, perhaps best known for “The God of Small Things,” her novel about relationships that cross lines of caste, class and religion, one of which leads to murder while another culminates in incest, had only recently turned again to fiction. It was another novel, but she was keeping the subject secret for now. She was still trying to shake herself free of her nearly two-decade-long role as an activist and public intellectual and spoke, with some reluctance, of one “last commitment.” It was more daring than her attacks on India’s occupation of Kashmir, the American wars in Iraq and Afghanistan or crony capitalism. This time, she had taken on Mahatma Gandhi.


    She’d been asked by a small Indian press, Navayana, to write an introduction to a new edition of “The Annihilation of Caste.” Written in 1936 by B. R. Ambedkar, the progressive leader who drafted the Indian Constitution and converted to Buddhism, the essay is perhaps the most famous modern-day attack on India’s caste system. It includes a rebuke of Gandhi, who wanted to abolish untouchability but not caste. Ambedkar saw the entire caste system as morally wrong and undemocratic. Reading Ambedkar’s and Gandhi’s arguments with each other, Roy became increasingly dismayed with what she saw as Gandhi’s regressive position. Her small introductory essay grew larger in her mind, “almost a little book in itself.” It would not pull its punches when it came to Gandhi and therefore would likely prove controversial. Even Ambedkar ran into difficulties. His views were considered so provocative that he was forced to self-publish. The more she spoke of it, the more mired in complications this last commitment of hers seemed.

    Roy led me into the next room, where books and journals were scattered around the kitchen table that serves as her desk. The collected writings of Ambedkar and Gandhi, voluminous and in combat with each other, sat in towering stacks, bookmarks tucked between the pages. The notebook in which Roy had been jotting down her thoughts in small, precise handwriting lay open on the table, a fragile intermediary in a nearly century-old debate between giants.

    “I got into trouble in the past for my nonfiction,” Roy said, “and I swore, ‘I’m never going to write anything with a footnote again.’ ” It’s a promise she has so far been unable to keep. “I’ve been gathering the thoughts for months, struggling with the questions, shocked by what I’ve been reading,” she said, when I asked if she had begun the essay. “I know that when it comes out, a lot is going to happen. But it’s something I need to do.”

    "

    Arundhati Roy, the Not-So-Reluctant Renegade - NYTimes.com (via outlawmidwives)

    (via catiebat)

  8. text

    Learning from Mel Gunasekera

    newssquirrel:

    I am fairly knocked for six today by the violent death of the Sri Lankan journalist Mel Gunasekera.

    I can’t claim to have known Mel well, but I first met her when I was a clueless beginner of a journalist working in the political beehive of the Maldives, and she gave me enormous amounts of…

  9. text
    animalstalkinginallcaps:

OH SWEET BABY JESUS THERE’S A CENTIPEDE IN THE BATHROOM! OH! OHMYGOD! OHMYGOD IT’S HUGE! PAUL! PAUL COME KILL IT!

[preorder the book]

    animalstalkinginallcaps:

    OH SWEET BABY JESUS THERE’S A CENTIPEDE IN THE BATHROOM! OH! OHMYGOD! OHMYGOD IT’S HUGE! PAUL! PAUL COME KILL IT!

    [preorder the book]

  10. art-stronomy:

    Donato Creti, Astronomical Observations, 1711, oil on canvas, Vatican Museum, Rome.

    Creti was comissioned by Bolognese count Luigi Marsili to create a series of all the planets and the moon, which was ultimately presented to Pope Clement XI in an effort to demonstrate the importance of astronomical observations. Apparently it worked, because with the Pope’s support, the first public astronomical observatory opened in Bologna a short time later. Pictured above are Creti’s representations of the Moon, a comet, and Venus, but the entire series included the whole solar system as it was known in the 18th century: the Sun, the Moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and a Comet. Uranus is missing because it was only discovered in 1781.  

    Source

    (via thinkkatethink)

  11. delilahdevil:

    cenobiteme:

    Javier Pérez: En Puntas (2013)

    Video installation of variable measurements comprising:
    Sculpture: pointe shoes, stainless steel knives
    Video projection: HD blu-ray, with sound, screened on a wall
    9’

    A ballerina, whose pointe shoes are extended by a set of sharp kitchen knives, dances and twirls insistently until reaching exhaustion, fighting to maintain balance on the lid of a grand piano set on a stage.  The theatre with its red velvet warm lighting, resembles an oversized music box. The camera turns around the dancer revealing the opposite side of the room: an empty and painfully bare theatre.

    The ballerina appears as an eerie figure expressing effort, sacrifice and pain in her strive for perfection. Both fragile and cruel. Initially shy and hesitant, her steps become more and more emphatic, menacing and not exempt of violence, scraping and cutting into the delicate surface of the piano with her sharp pointe shoes.

    Through this work, Javier Perez investigates and reflects once again upon the human condition. Using a strongly metaphorical language rich in powerful symbolism, he reveals the weaknesses that become the boundaries between seemingly irreconcilable concepts such as: beauty and cruelty, fragility and violence, culture and nature or life and death.

    watch the video performance

    The video is actually terrifying omg

    (Source: myampgoesto11, via catiebat)

  12. Tilda Swinton as David Bowie by Craig Mcdean for Vogue italia 

    (Source: dansmonunivers, via sigh-twombly)

  13. text
    kp-ks:

Book Burning Memorial
'In the center of Bebelplatz, a glass window showing rows and rows of empty bookshelves. The memorial commemorates the night in 1933 when 20,000 “anti-German” books were burned here under the instigation of Goebbels. There's a plaque nearby that says something like “Where they burn books, they will also burn humans in the end.” '

    kp-ks:

    Book Burning Memorial

    'In the center of Bebelplatz, a glass window showing rows and rows of empty bookshelves. The memorial commemorates the night in 1933 when 20,000 “anti-German” books were burned here under the instigation of Goebbels. There's a plaque nearby that says something like “Where they burn books, they will also burn humans in the end.” '

    (via catiebat)

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