1. lecinematheque:

    Pumzi - dir. Wanuri Kahiu // Kenya

    In a dystopian future 35 years after an ecological WWIII  has torn the world apart, East African survivors of the devastation remain locked away in contained communities, but a young woman in possession of a germinating seed struggles against the governing council to bring the plant to Earth’s ruined surface.

    (via catiebat)

  2. text

    "

    Roy, perhaps best known for “The God of Small Things,” her novel about relationships that cross lines of caste, class and religion, one of which leads to murder while another culminates in incest, had only recently turned again to fiction. It was another novel, but she was keeping the subject secret for now. She was still trying to shake herself free of her nearly two-decade-long role as an activist and public intellectual and spoke, with some reluctance, of one “last commitment.” It was more daring than her attacks on India’s occupation of Kashmir, the American wars in Iraq and Afghanistan or crony capitalism. This time, she had taken on Mahatma Gandhi.


    She’d been asked by a small Indian press, Navayana, to write an introduction to a new edition of “The Annihilation of Caste.” Written in 1936 by B. R. Ambedkar, the progressive leader who drafted the Indian Constitution and converted to Buddhism, the essay is perhaps the most famous modern-day attack on India’s caste system. It includes a rebuke of Gandhi, who wanted to abolish untouchability but not caste. Ambedkar saw the entire caste system as morally wrong and undemocratic. Reading Ambedkar’s and Gandhi’s arguments with each other, Roy became increasingly dismayed with what she saw as Gandhi’s regressive position. Her small introductory essay grew larger in her mind, “almost a little book in itself.” It would not pull its punches when it came to Gandhi and therefore would likely prove controversial. Even Ambedkar ran into difficulties. His views were considered so provocative that he was forced to self-publish. The more she spoke of it, the more mired in complications this last commitment of hers seemed.

    Roy led me into the next room, where books and journals were scattered around the kitchen table that serves as her desk. The collected writings of Ambedkar and Gandhi, voluminous and in combat with each other, sat in towering stacks, bookmarks tucked between the pages. The notebook in which Roy had been jotting down her thoughts in small, precise handwriting lay open on the table, a fragile intermediary in a nearly century-old debate between giants.

    “I got into trouble in the past for my nonfiction,” Roy said, “and I swore, ‘I’m never going to write anything with a footnote again.’ ” It’s a promise she has so far been unable to keep. “I’ve been gathering the thoughts for months, struggling with the questions, shocked by what I’ve been reading,” she said, when I asked if she had begun the essay. “I know that when it comes out, a lot is going to happen. But it’s something I need to do.”

    "

    Arundhati Roy, the Not-So-Reluctant Renegade - NYTimes.com (via outlawmidwives)

    (via catiebat)

  3. text

    Learning from Mel Gunasekera

    newssquirrel:

    I am fairly knocked for six today by the violent death of the Sri Lankan journalist Mel Gunasekera.

    I can’t claim to have known Mel well, but I first met her when I was a clueless beginner of a journalist working in the political beehive of the Maldives, and she gave me enormous amounts of…

  4. text
    animalstalkinginallcaps:

OH SWEET BABY JESUS THERE’S A CENTIPEDE IN THE BATHROOM! OH! OHMYGOD! OHMYGOD IT’S HUGE! PAUL! PAUL COME KILL IT!

[preorder the book]

    animalstalkinginallcaps:

    OH SWEET BABY JESUS THERE’S A CENTIPEDE IN THE BATHROOM! OH! OHMYGOD! OHMYGOD IT’S HUGE! PAUL! PAUL COME KILL IT!

    [preorder the book]

  5. art-stronomy:

    Donato Creti, Astronomical Observations, 1711, oil on canvas, Vatican Museum, Rome.

    Creti was comissioned by Bolognese count Luigi Marsili to create a series of all the planets and the moon, which was ultimately presented to Pope Clement XI in an effort to demonstrate the importance of astronomical observations. Apparently it worked, because with the Pope’s support, the first public astronomical observatory opened in Bologna a short time later. Pictured above are Creti’s representations of the Moon, a comet, and Venus, but the entire series included the whole solar system as it was known in the 18th century: the Sun, the Moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and a Comet. Uranus is missing because it was only discovered in 1781.  

    Source

    (via thinkkatethink)

  6. delilahdevil:

    cenobiteme:

    Javier Pérez: En Puntas (2013)

    Video installation of variable measurements comprising:
    Sculpture: pointe shoes, stainless steel knives
    Video projection: HD blu-ray, with sound, screened on a wall
    9’

    A ballerina, whose pointe shoes are extended by a set of sharp kitchen knives, dances and twirls insistently until reaching exhaustion, fighting to maintain balance on the lid of a grand piano set on a stage.  The theatre with its red velvet warm lighting, resembles an oversized music box. The camera turns around the dancer revealing the opposite side of the room: an empty and painfully bare theatre.

    The ballerina appears as an eerie figure expressing effort, sacrifice and pain in her strive for perfection. Both fragile and cruel. Initially shy and hesitant, her steps become more and more emphatic, menacing and not exempt of violence, scraping and cutting into the delicate surface of the piano with her sharp pointe shoes.

    Through this work, Javier Perez investigates and reflects once again upon the human condition. Using a strongly metaphorical language rich in powerful symbolism, he reveals the weaknesses that become the boundaries between seemingly irreconcilable concepts such as: beauty and cruelty, fragility and violence, culture and nature or life and death.

    watch the video performance

    The video is actually terrifying omg

    (Source: myampgoesto11, via catiebat)

  7. Tilda Swinton as David Bowie by Craig Mcdean for Vogue italia 

    (Source: dansmonunivers, via electrichoney)

  8. text
    kp-ks:

Book Burning Memorial
'In the center of Bebelplatz, a glass window showing rows and rows of empty bookshelves. The memorial commemorates the night in 1933 when 20,000 “anti-German” books were burned here under the instigation of Goebbels. There's a plaque nearby that says something like “Where they burn books, they will also burn humans in the end.” '

    kp-ks:

    Book Burning Memorial

    'In the center of Bebelplatz, a glass window showing rows and rows of empty bookshelves. The memorial commemorates the night in 1933 when 20,000 “anti-German” books were burned here under the instigation of Goebbels. There's a plaque nearby that says something like “Where they burn books, they will also burn humans in the end.” '

    (via catiebat)

  9. text
    berfrois:



Frederick Childe Hassam, Couch on the Porch, Cos Cob, 1914

    berfrois:

    Frederick Childe Hassam, Couch on the Porch, Cos Cob, 1914

    (via lexluthr)

  10. text
    fernandofrench:

Roald Dahl’s workspace, and 39 others.

    fernandofrench:

    Roald Dahl’s workspace, and 39 others.

  11. text

    "

    For most of the human race, pretty much all of the lifespan of the human race, information was currency. Information was like gold. It was rare, it was hard to find, it was expensive. You could get your information, but you had to know where to go, you had to know what you were looking at, you had to know how to find your information. It was hard. And librarians were the key players in the battle for information, because they could go and get and bring back this golden nugget for you, the thing that you needed.

    Over the last decade, which is less than a blink of an eye in the history of the human race, it’s all changed. And we’ve gone from a world in which there is too little information, in which information is scarce, to a world in which there is too much information, and most of it is untrue or irrelevant. You know, the world of the Internet is the world of information that is not actually so. It’s a world of information that just isn’t actually true, or if it is true, it’s not what you needed, or it doesn’t actually apply like that, or whatever. And you suddenly move into a world in which librarians fulfill this completely different function.

    We’ve gone from looking at a desert, in which a librarian had to walk into the desert for you and come back with a lump of gold, to a forest, to this huge jungle in which what you want is one apple. And at that point, the librarian can walk into the jungle and come back with the apple. So I think from that point of view, the time of librarians, and the time of libraries—they definitely haven’t gone anywhere.

    "

    [Neil Gaiman talks about his love of libraries.] (via watchhowisoar)

    And I stand by every word of it.

    (via neil-gaiman)

    (via wilwheaton)

  12. text
    100daystyleradamsmith:

DAY: 74/100
Richard Dawkins: “”Are You There God? It’s Me, Richard… Of Course Not: a dissection of theological and existential indoctrination in youth literature “

    100daystyleradamsmith:

    DAY: 74/100

    Richard Dawkins: “”Are You There God? It’s Me, Richard… Of Course Not: a dissection of theological and existential indoctrination in youth literature “

  13. text
    beepbopboopbeepbop:

NEW GRAPHIC for Businessweek. When you search for something on Google, its algorithms will usually respond with suggestions for what it thinks you’re looking for based on other popular searches. It’s a helpful tool, but also a window into our collective psyche. Try Googling “Why” and see what comes up. The cascade of suggestions that Google generates can also feel less like asking for a professional or qualified answer and more like an exercise in Dadaism poetry.
Above, a few inspired from googlepoetics.com

    beepbopboopbeepbop:

    NEW GRAPHIC for Businessweek. When you search for something on Google, its algorithms will usually respond with suggestions for what it thinks you’re looking for based on other popular searches. It’s a helpful tool, but also a window into our collective psyche. Try Googling “Why” and see what comes up. The cascade of suggestions that Google generates can also feel less like asking for a professional or qualified answer and more like an exercise in Dadaism poetry.

    Above, a few inspired from googlepoetics.com

  14. text

    The Strange Story of America's Most Delightfully Weird Catalogue

    Alien-themed butler trays! Shocking mergers! Bizarrely profitable weight-loss products! Yes, SkyMall’s business story is as wild and wide-ranging as its offerings.

    (Source: the-feature)

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